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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
. obama says only courage will head off financial default now. assassination in afghanistan. mandy clark reports that president karzai's brother was gunned down. laid off on day one. cynthia bowers in a city so strapped it's firing cops as soon as they get their badge. and the first, first lady of the modern age, bill whitaker remembers betty ford who forever changed how america views the white house. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from washington. >> pelley: good evening. it was a striking thing, today, to hear the president of the united states say that he cannot guarantee the 27 million social security checks that you are due to be mailed august 3rd. august 3rd is the day after the government will default on its debts if democrats and republicans do not agree to increase the nation's borrowing limit. both sides say they won't raise the limit without a deal to massively cut the federal deficit. a u.s. default would shake the world economy. the stakes could not be higher. time is growing short. in our interview, president o
, in the strongest possible terms, the assassination in afghanistan today of president hamid karzai's half brother, ahmed wali karzai, seen as the most powerful man in southern afghanistan was shot in his own home in kandahar by a man he knew and trusted. mandy clark is in kandahar. >> reporter: ahmad wali karzai was rushed to this kandahar hospital but with multiple gunshot wounds there was no chance he would survive. outside in the street lay the body of the man who had gotten through a tight ring of security to gun him down. >> my younger brother was murdered in his house this morning. president hamid karzai announced. ahmed wali karzai was a tribal council leader and considered the most powerful man in southern afghanistan. the attack stunned the city that has been hit by a series of targeted assassinations. this is the place, headquarters in kandahar city. moments ago word of the shooting came through as the police chief was wrapping up his interview with us and he rushed out to take charge. general abdul raziq told us that security was improving in the city when his two cell phones lit up at
.s. commander in afghanistan on the future of the war and the decision to begin pulling out. the man accused of the worst war crimes in europe since the natsys shows nothing but contempt for justice. mark phillips has the pictures from the court. and on this fourth of july as the space shuttle program nears an end, jim axelrod asks "what happened to the flags on the moon?" >> it's beautiful. >> pelley: do those star spangled banners yet wave? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, chantix is the most popular anti-smoking drug on the market with annual sales of nearly $800 million. but a study out today raises new safety questions about it. chantix has already been linked to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and now to a higher risk of heart disease we asked dr. jon lapook to tell us what we need to know about these new findings. >> reporter: today's study is worrisome news for the more than seven million americans who have taken chantix. a new analysis links the pill to a 72% increase in the risk of heart problems. johns ho
in afghanistan said today the focus of the war is about to shift away from taliban strongholds in the south and to the eastern border with pakistan where al qaeda still operates. general david petraeus is retiring from the army later this month and will become the new director of the c.i.a. mandy clark spoke with him today in kabul about the way forward in afghanistan. >> reporter: the last days of general david petraeus's command have been marked by two major events: the president's decision to begin withdrawing u.s. forces and days later an audacious attack on one of kabul's most important hotels. general petraeus told us the assault should not be seen as a setback. do you really think that the afghan security forces are ready if they can't protect a major hotel in the cap all? >> i can tell you that our special forces who were sporp not leading and not doing-- for the afghan forces who saw the crisis response unit said that they responded very courageously. in fact, that they took the loss of life with the wounded in action i think underscores that fact. >> reporter: but the training of
in 2002 in pakistan and held at a secret prison in afghanistan known as the salt pit. hosed down and left in an unheated cell overnight, rahman died of hypothermia. neither prisoner had been singled out for special interrogation. they both apparently died of simple misuse or neglect. >> pelley: david, what are you hearing about the c.i.a.'s reaction to this today? >> reporter: well, this happens to be c.i.a. director leon panetta's last day on the job before he takes over as secretary of defense. none of this happened on his watch, but he is clearly pleased by the decision. he issued a statement, saying "we are now finally about to close this chapter in our agency's history." >> pelley: thank you, david. leon panetta will be taking over tomorrow for robert gates. today, president obama surprised the outgoing defense secretary with a going-away present: the medal of freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. gates was appointed by president george w. bush four and a half years ago and stayed on to help president obama manage the wars in iraq and afghanistan. we have done a number of sto
attacks against u.s. troops in afghanistan. two sources tell us that he was killed last month in pakistan by a u.s. drone. one official said to us today, "we know we got him this time." at the white house today, the president said he will begin sending condolence letters to families of troops who commit suicide in a war zone. troops who die in combat have always received this honor. but for generations, suicide victims have not been acknowledged by the president. the white house has been reviewing this policy, but mr. obama took action one week after elaine quijano first reported this story on our broadcast. elaine? >> reporter: well, scott, the president says he made the change to the condolence letter policy to remove the stigma associated with one of the unseen wounds of war-- suicide. in a written statement, the president said: the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that th
parties to the white house for talks on thursday. it was a deadly day for u.s. troops in afghanistan. three americans were killed and one was wounded when they were attacked by insurgents in the eastern part of the country. their afghan interpreter was also killed. most american families who lose a loved one in a war zone get a letter of condolence from the president of the united states. but there are a few who are denied that honor. among them, families of troops who commit suicide. we first reported this last week and tonight we have learned that the white house is changing its policy. elaine quijano brings us up to date with the father who led the fight to change the rules. >> i had many doubts. many, many doubts but we're very pleased. >> reporter: last week, greg kiessling got the call from the white house he'd waited nearly two years to receive. he learned his family's long wait for acknowledgment from the commander-in-chief was almost over. >> o'neil, my oldest son, came down, we had a hug and it was very emotional. and "dad, it's going to happen." and that was very good mome
't get the help they needed must change." the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that the white house really needs to redouble its resolve to addressing this suicide epidemic head on. >> would not try to seek honor, nor was he being a coward. >> reporter: if anyone can be credited with changing the policy it's greg and janet keesling, they have been fighting for the change since 2009. that's the year their son, 25-year-old army specialist chance keesling, killed himself on his second tour in iraq. they say acknowledgement from the president gives them some comfort. >> he was a good soldier. so i think that's the part that i want to know that the country appreciates, that he fought, he did everything he was asked to do. >> reporter: but there are still military families who will not be receiving condolence letters. the policy change does not include suicide or training acciden
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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